Saturday, May 12, 2012

Fort Kongenstein, Ada, Ghana

Fort Kongenstein

Fort Kongenstein, Ada

Only traces of Fort Kongenstein may be found in Ada, in the Greater Accra Region. The port of Ada is located at the mouth of the Volta River: thus, Ada boasts both of outstanding beaches and exquisite riverfront scenery. The small fort built by the Danish in 1783 was purchased by the English on the 15th of March 1850 . The fort has since disappeared into the sea.

Dutch traders were the first to open up trade between Europe and Ada in the 16th century and built a new trading post in 1775. Later, the Danes took over, who at this time had power over the whole coast east of Accra. They remained in Ada for more than 100 years and had friendly business relationships with the locals. To defend their trading post against the attacking neighboring tribes, the Danes built Fort Kongenstein in 1783. This fort actually gave Ada Foah its name: Ada Fort, village of the fort.

When the British arrived at the end of the 19th century, the Danish sold their forts and trading posts to them. That was the time independence ended and British Colonial Rule was imposed. In contrast to the peaceful cooperation with the Danish, the British treated the people of Ada, also called Adali, like conquered people.

During this time of trading with the Europeans Ada also became a major market for the slave trade. After slave trade had been abolished, the Adas traded products of the African tropical forest (mostly palm oil, palm kernels and rubber).

Ada used to be a major trading center and trade was one of the main sources of income. There were large warehouses for storing the trading goods close to the seaside. Its special location at the estuary ensured a quick transportation along the Volta River up to the North of the country. The economic activities reached a peak around 1901 when a transportation system called the Volta River Transport System was launched. (source: Wikipedia)

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