Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Slave Bill of Sales

Slave Bill of Sales - A slave bill of sale was a contract between a slave owner and a potential buyer detailing the selling of a slave. These contracts stated the location of the slave owner, the name and location of the buyer, the amount the slave was sold for, and the gender, name and age of the slave. In the event a female slave was sold, the seller would usually state in the slave bill of sale that the new buyer would have full rights and ownership of any future children the slave might have. These slave bills of sales represented a loop hole for slave owners and buyers to continue the internal trading of slaves even though the Mid-Atlantic slave trade had officially ended on January 1, 1808. Nick Weeks


1767 Bill of Sale

A handwritten copy of an original bill of sale stemming from 1767. In this transaction, David Hohanas Ackerman of Tapan, NY sold one "Negro boy about three years of age named Less," to Peter Peterse Demary of Hackensack for the sum of twenty pounds. Transcript included From the collections of the Bergen County Historical Society


1770s Bill of Sale

An original bill of sale from the 1770s that details Dirck Terhune's purchase of a "Negro boy named Cyor" from Peter Peterse Demerast of Hackensack for the sum of ninety pounds. Transcript Included From the collections of the Bergen County Historical Society


1782 Bill of Sale

A 1782 slave bill of sale for a man named Tom, a "wench" named Dinah and two children named Sam and Luce. Sold by Elias Romaine of Bergen County to Abraham Ely for 76 pounds, 10 shillings in gold and silver. Transcript Included From the collections of the Bergen County Historical Society


1784 Slave Sale Between Brothers

A 1784 letter from Isaac Van Geson of Secaucus to his brother regarding the sale of a slave named Terance. Transcript Included From the collections of the Bergen County Historical Society


1790 Bill of Sale

A bill of sale from 1790 detailing the account of Richard Reyson of Pompton who purchased a slave named Claus after a four week trial. From the collections of the Bergen County Historical Society

1806 Bill of Sale

An original bill of sale from 1806 that details John A. Holmes' purchase of a Negro named Abraham from Jacob Lawrence of Township of Middletown, Monmouth County for $275. Transcript Included From the collections of the New Jersey Historical Society


1815 Bill of Sale

A handwritten bill of sale detailing Richard N. Terhune's purchase of a 12 year-old "Negro Boy named Jack," from Benjamin Vreeland of New Barbadoes Township. Transcript included. From the collections of the Bergen County Historical Society


Colonial Will & Inventory - 1747 &1748

A "Colonial Will" from 1747 listing the possessions of Nathaniel Irish of Bethlem, Hunterdon County, NJ. In this will, it is stated that Nathaniel Irish will bequest his daughter "a negro woman named Martilla, and her daughter, Betty. Also included, is a letter inventory of a firm named Allen & Turner, amongst their possessions are a grist mill worth £23; tools worth £12; and 18 negroes worth £600.(source: http://sites.bergen.org/ourstory/Resources/slave&war/sl_primary.htm)

3 comments:

  1. Hello,
    Would love to find the source for some of the photographs displayed on your blog on Tuesday December 27th -photographs 1 and 2. My e-mail is: julian.vinuales@globalrhythmpress.com
    Thanks for your help,
    Best,
    Julíán

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the compliment, however I don't own these images. These images are just a collection of gorgeous children who were beautifully photographed. This is an educational site and the images are meant to enhance your understanding of human beings being sold. What would the eyes of a child on an auction block look like. How would feel being sold to strangers. The disorientation of being orphaned on an auction block seems unbearable.

    But, the age of the most valuable slaves in the USA was between the ages of 8-18. 70% of most slave auctions were for children and young adults. I want to put a face on slavery--and not a happy face. These were living human beings, they were children without a childhood, they were auction block orphans. Their story gets written out of the history books, and whitewashed in our collective historic memories. No, I don't own the images, but I look for faces to tell that story. These photographers have a sensitivity and an eye for framing their subjects. Here are the links to the images below:

    Image #1 comes from: http://butchpowwow.com/help-people-in-africa.html

    Image #2 comes from: krestakingphotography at http://www.photoree.com/topic/gallery/krestakingphotography/2

    ReplyDelete

There was an error in this gadget

HOME

HOME
Click here to return to the US Slave Home Page