Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Prince Among Slaves Enhancement

Video Edited by Wankhavi Wakhisi 1788. The slave ship Africa set sail from Gambia, West Africa, its berth laden with a profitable but highly perishable cargo-hundreds of men, women and children bound in chains--headed to American shores. Six months later, a handful of survivors would find themselves for sale in Natchez, Mississippi. One of them, a 26-year-old man named Abdul Rahman Ibrahima would make a most remarkable claim to Thomas Foster, the tobacco farmer who purchased him at auction: As an African prince, highly educated and heir to a kingdom, his father would gladly pay gold for his return. Abdul Rahman would not return to Africa for another 40 years. In that time he would toil on the plantation to make his owner rich. He would marry and father nine children. He would also become the most famous African in America, attracting the support of such powerful men as President John Quincy Adams and Secretary of State Henry Clay. Later in life, he would travel widely throughout the northern states, speaking to huge audiences in an attempt to raise enough money to buy his children out of slavery. And finally, at the age of 67, he would return to Africa, only to fall ill and die just as word of his return reached his former kingdom. Through it all, Abdul would maintain his dignity and hope for the freedom of his people.


No comments:

Post a Comment

There was an error in this gadget


Click here to return to the US Slave Home Page